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CSPAN
Nov 18, 2012 10:15am EST
of the west, the ramparts of america from the retirement plan for any right-thinking, free man. i join with you today, ladies and gentlemen on my name to visit to these united states of america. the most daring of human experiments. even today it is the incomparable strength, unrivaled innovation and immeasurable greatness, all of which coalesce , all of which amalgamate to produce the most depraved culture imaginable. it is the culture that captured the heart and mind that this australia. it is the idea that shaped these policies and personality. it is the ideal that makes you feel it/should should be sure to present in every 10 years criticism of a niche in to which he doesn't even belong. it is the equation that taught him that everything and anything is possible. it is the nation. this is the land of the possible, the land in which men and women are born in and give an opportunity for liberty, where liberties guaranteed. it is the same land that the tennessean teenager, floridian father, maryland mother with a bond under one flag, the train of a better life. free to choose their ow
CSPAN
Nov 12, 2012 8:30pm EST
unspent that can go out and serve unserved america today. the same issue will be in front of us in 2013. that's what windstream's waiver is all about. is there other ways to think about this other than setting this $775 limit? beyond that, i think getting on to the model that we need going forward for universal service funding. the industry, put forth a model, but the fcc needs their own model which will drive calf too, that's where the energy needs to be put. that's where the biggest bang for the buck will be in the business because, remember, as we looked at these more than minor changes in the financials of the telephone companies across the country, it was so important that we do these two things coi understand didn'tly. -- coincidentally. we got out of sync, one down efficiently and fast. we just have to work the usf thing, and it's about the consumer. >> host: jeff gardner, president and ceo of the windstream corporation. he is also chairman this year of the u.s. telecom trade association. he's been our guest on "the communicators" along with paul barbagallo of bloomberg.
CSPAN
Nov 18, 2012 9:30am EST
a history of america's global participation and influence from 1898 to 1945. the author posits that during this time the united states introduced numerous political, cultural and economic ideas to the rest of the world. >> good afternoon. thank you for joining us here at the heritage foundation in our louis lehrman auditorium. we welcome those who join us on our web site on all these occasions. if you'll be so kind to check cell phones one last time and see that they're turned off. thank you, larry. amazing how many speakers actually start doing that when i say that. we will post the program on our web site within 24 hours for our future reference and, of course, our internet viewers are always welcome to e-mail us with questions or comments, simply writing those to speaker@heritage.org. our guest today, dr. larry schweikart, is a native of arizona. he earned his bachelor and master's degree at arizona state university and received his doctorate from the university of california santa barbara. throughout his high school and college, however, he spent most of his time playing drums in a var
CSPAN
Nov 11, 2012 10:00pm EST
to destroy them. what are the four pillars? first, america was founded in the christian religion and predominantly influenced by protestant. by the 20th century catholic, jewish but important role a culture 190000 so fundamentally protestant and even the progressives emerged from the liberal protestant churches. this reinforced the second exceptional pillar, ma, which causes the last given from god to defeat all in bubbles upward to the rulers. kids says the government of the people, by the people and for the people that lincoln referred to peer, my stands in stark opposition to every other nation on earth that is develop some form of civil law and which the law. germany and england had come them off for a while but by the 20 century, both have more or less abandoned it, germany more so than england. their further the end of world war ii, when europe unloaded, however unwillingly its colony, those colonies themselves to find and print process of the law. thus the first of pillars taken together means that a christian, protestant religion influence and shape everything about ameri
CSPAN
Nov 25, 2012 4:30pm EST
. these are shaped america and in the same pillars are often largely or even entirely ignored in shaping the postwar world in world war i and later decolonization of the world, part of the second volume. this book follows a 50 year struggle between those who call constitutionalists who want to strengthen the four pillars and progressives who want to destroy them. what are the four pillars? first, america was founded on the christian religion and predominantly influenced by protestantism. by the 20th century cat and jewish played an important role, the culture of 1900 was fundamentally protestant and even the progressives emerge from the liberal protestant churches. this reinforced the second exceptional pillar, common law, which causes that god has given her the law given from god to the people and bubbles upward to the rulers. this gives us the government of the people, by the people and for the people that lincoln referred to. common law stands in stark opposition to almost every other nation on earth that is develop some form of civil law in which it trickles down from the top. both germany and e
CSPAN
Nov 12, 2012 11:00pm EST
because that's supposed to be your lot in life is get married and have children. so i think america has a lot of all of that together and their legislation and the things you're asking for in getting people to realize this human rights. this human rights and we are all human. african-american, latina, all of them are human. so how is the next that going towards moving towards an area of getting terms that are acceptable but don't get people coming in now, you say i'm a feminist that are except the red flag and people don't listen to you. so how do we move and strive to take the religious stuff out of the marriage and just take that out. same thing with the hospitals. yes catholic hospitals, but they have the right not to service people. and if they have the right not to service, where they getting federal funds come in medicaid, money? so when you have to look at it, a lot of religion is smashed into hurricanes. so are there any groups that are targeting that area quite >> i'll be really quick on this one can say a lot of the advocacy organizations, including ours are working on moving
CSPAN
Nov 23, 2012 11:00pm EST
in 1979, but the issue rears its head every four years when people look around and wonder why america needs this antiquated contraption. and, unfortunately, i was looking in here for the name of the book. two people have no ask you. what about posting that on your website? >> if you don't mind my looking i can look in -- i think i have my book right here. perhaps i can come up with it. i believe it is called, how democratic is the american constitution? the author is a yale scholar, and i think, you know, i am under tv lights for too long. my brain is not coming up as something of a measly much better producing. >> host: okay. we are almost out of time anyway. if i give you 30 seconds to answer this question, and that's not very fair. there was an e-mail here that i wanted to finish with. and unfortunately, no i have put it under one of your books. i haven't read here. this is from allison in norman, oklahoma. when i was in elementary school in the 1950's, each classroom displayed a world map that put the u.s. squarely in the center of the world. the eurasian continent was split into,
CSPAN
Nov 3, 2012 7:15pm EDT
with the actual history of civil rights in america or who have read my books notice that they had not read the books, but that was great because they believe everything the "new york times" believes, but the new york times won't argue with me. at least the gals on "the view" will argue with me. the summary of the book is white guilt never produced anything good, and don't make the same mistake again, america. that's why it had to come out before the election. it's a book about racism, and to my critics chagrin, i'm against it. [laughter] liberals have been the primary practitioners of it, and i start with the golden age of racial demagoguery in the 70s and 80s when every police shooting of a black kid would be the next case, treated in the media, suddenly the clan took over the new york city police force apparently. one of my -- it's hard to describe the beginnings because there's the brawl and various race hoaxes, and much like the trayvon martin case, they disappeared once the facts came out. you never get that final article saying, attention, readers, that story we've been his hysterica
CSPAN
Nov 12, 2012 8:00am EST
of america from the very biggest -- seizen, at&t -- to some of the very smallest. and what we try to do is really get together as a group, put together ideas so that we can really take care of our consumers in a better way. >> host: so when you talk about the small telephone companies, how many are there out here in the united states now? >> guest: there's thousands of telephone companies in the u.s. still, and so there's been plenty of consolidation, but there's still a lot of very small telephone companies. we have from verizon to small companies that are co-ops even involved in united states telephone association today. so still many different business issues as a part of that. we all try to work together to really solve common issues. that's what the whole purpose of the association is. >> host: and we want to get into some of those policy issues in just a minute, but first of all, what is windstream? >> guest: windstream is a wonderful company. i may be bias inside that review, but we're a mainly focused in rural america. we provide local telecom service, the triple play, if you wi
CSPAN
Nov 12, 2012 8:00pm EST
in that review, but we're mainly focused in rural america providing local tfn service, triple play, if you will, voice, broadband, very rural stretching from new mexico to upstate new york serving 3 million customers. we're in very rural markets. some in the state of texas, the average access lines per square mile are eight. that's eight households in a per square mile, different than an urban telephone company, and we've done a good job getting service to the customers. we're also a story of two businesses, and then we'll also focused on the enterprise segment where we sell to medium and small businesses, telecom services, cloud computing, to broadband to voice. >> host: who's your competitors and collaborators? >> guest: it's complicated; right? our friends are our competitors. we compete with the cable companies primarily. we compete with the wireless companies. those would be the principle competitors. >> host: do you ever collaborate with them? >> guest: all the time. today, i meet with at&t, verizon, other companies like them who we work together, and we compete against each other in ways
CSPAN
Nov 18, 2012 5:30pm EST
languages as well. >> and we have some more than 70 writers from different countries , from latin america and spain that will be with us as well as the featured country this year, the country of pair guy. and we invite you to the opening of the pavilion next thursday, and we will have the first lady of the country doing the honors of opening the pavilion. so please come by, learn about their culture, traditions and their literature throughout the whole weekend. >> and if you'll welcome -- if you'll excuse on a personal note, i've been working with alina very closely. alina's the executive director of the center here at the college. before that she was the executive director of the miami book fair for i won't tell you how many years. [laughter] it was a lot of years. >> a lot. >> and it's just been announced that alina is now the director of -- executive director of cultural affairs for the entire miami-dade college. we want to congratulate her on her new appointment as well. [applause] >> thank you, thank you. i'm looking forward to that. and part of my new responsibilities is to also wor
CSPAN
Nov 26, 2012 1:15am EST
for decades and that is what represented america pez influence as a prolonged role in the gulf. >>host: i always think of the british of involvement in the middle east. how did they step back? >>guest: with regard to the gulf of brits arrived in the 1800 representing their quest to provide order on the flanks to the imperial interest of india. the southern coast of the gulf was called the piru coast. constantly feuding tribes would feud with one another spilling out of the seaboard approach to in the and resulted in the tax on india. so the british found themselves pooled into the gulf during the 1800's. not to colonize it to maintain order. they did with the relatively small amount of military force. but you are right. up through the early 1870's was one of british hegemonic control over the persian golf. the aftermath of rope or two with the independence of india that the british brigade at -- began their retrenchment with the independence of india, the british lost the rationale for their military presence and their lost the money to pay for their presence there. >>host: did the americ
CSPAN
Nov 20, 2012 11:00pm EST
represents is the coming together, the mixture, the melting, the synthesis of all the communities of america. look at america's urban communities today. in america's urban communities, every group resides. every economic class resides. every strand of political philosophy resides. great academic institutions make up the fabric of urban america. great media organizations, libraries, cultural institutions make it the fabric of urban america. urban represents the best of america and represents the 21st century america is really all about, which is each and every one of us together, deplorably spooned them. so i encourage people b&b around terminology that we understand what it means. and so the. , while it is a discussion about challenges, problems and solutions that urban communities face, it is a discussion about challenges, opportunities, solutions for the nation at large. i submit to you in 21st century america, the suburbs are now part of urban america. witness the suburbs of this capital city, whether it's northern virginia or maryland and you find the very same tapestry of america that i
CSPAN
Nov 25, 2012 1:00am EST
the middle part is when it changed overnight with the o.j. verdict. tennis 3:00 p.m. 1995 went wide america saw the majority black jury eight acquit the what celebrity and blacks america ugh cheered the verdict america said the white guilt bank has shut down. overnight. [applause] not only would of fulfilling that happened to discourse and relations but to black people suddenly and -- justice jackson and all sharpener not the sole spokesperson certainly those policies of welfare reform law and order they have been demagogue when nixon says law-and-order we know what he talks about. those were reagan and bush and rudy guiliani bless his soul tens of thousands of black lives were saved when will fare was one of the reform to blacks of lives were saved in a different way law-and-order was so saved and bill clinton took credit for both. [laughter] and we have 12 years of paradise where i describe the many wonderful things that happened. people are not walking on eggshells is a more. people had to be worried you would innocently say a word then you would ruin your career, you'd be hated by all o
CSPAN
Nov 26, 2012 1:00am EST
as the insulting term is america and mercenaries because we paid for the military part where but for four years thailand would carry out the war and what they saw as their war in south vietnam's. casualty's is what we should keep in mind. >>host: professor ruth when did relations tel? they participated in the iraq war and world war ii. >> you can daypack to the famous example of the abraham lincoln war elephant troubles with the war but in the 20th century with the close u.s. ally -- ally disrupted partly but as soon as the cold war gels thailand comes as the strong u.s. ally and definitely a strong cold war ally as the component to the u.s. global strategy. >>host: why do you call it "in buddha's company"? >> those who fought saw themselves says buddhist warriors. some as a logical someday tried to halt communism as a threat to the practice of values or religious tradition they saw buddhism and is under threat by a communism past to do with thailand as being the center of the intense tradition and many thai soldi
CSPAN
Nov 4, 2012 1:00am EDT
're talking with the sheriff, the tougherrest shall have in america. [speaking spanish] joe, you should understand these imgrants. exclusive if they want to live together. they don't want to follow our laws. on glenn beck tonight, and i don't understand the people, illegal is illegal, joe, and so, i mean, tell the audience, i mean, tell them how you know they're illegal. well, i don't know, we're just going to do it. i don't care what they say. glenn beck show, racial profiling. so what? talking with the sheriff, under investigation by the department of justice for the worst cases of racial profiling in american history, but that's not the issue tonight on fox news. we are talking about the cold case posse with evidence that perhaps the man in the white house is, perhaps, from kenya. governor brewer and her finger, i'm going to get you my little pretty. when that happens, her book shuts number seven on amazon. she had 500,000 friends on facebook, and i read comments every night to see what they think. the washington post said she played chicken with them on health care, and said, stay o
CSPAN
Nov 10, 2012 6:00pm EST
tanks in america. c-span: and where is claremont, california? what's it near? >> guest: well, it's about 30 miles east of la. c-span: in the beginning of your book under acknowledgments, you say, 'through the generosity of henry salvatori, charles kessler brought me to claremont mckenna college as a salvatori visiting scholar.' >> guest: right. c-span: who is henry salvatori? >> guest: salvatori just died recently at the age of--you know, i think he was about 97. he was an italian immigrant who was a very successful businessman and made a pile of money developing techniques of oil exploration that turned out to be very successful. and in his later years, he became a major donor to causes and to people who were interested in restoring the principles of the founding. and he established a center at claremont mckenna college, the salvatori center, which is directed by charles kessler. and they brought me out there knowing that i was somebody who could help advance that work. c-span: where were you when they brought you out there? >> guest: well, i'm based in irving, texas, at the university
CSPAN
Nov 5, 2012 12:00am EST
about michiganology, geography and more. he has written 12 adult nonfiction books, including america's hidden history, a nation rising, and don't know much about the american presidents. >> host: where did the "don't know much about" series come from? >> guest: the idea came from my own little brain, although it didn't start out as a series. it started out with the idea i loved american history. i wanted to write about it in a way that shared my enthusiasm for a subject that i've loved since i was small child. the title came, of course, from sam cook's wonderful song, which i knew from childhood, and so it got stuck in my head, and certainly the success of the book, which caught me by surprise more than anyone else, perhaps, led to the beginning of a series. geography followed, and then on and on it went from there. so, with no pretensions offing writing this book simply because i loved american history. i couldn't understand why people were poured by it, why we had surveys that said 17-year-olds don't know their american history, and i wanted to write something i thought would addre
CSPAN
Nov 10, 2012 11:45pm EST
said when the gap back to america he would train slaves that they would become could citizens and free people of the united states. but when he got back things changed. >> welcome to the 303rd annual american book awards co-sponsored by the columbus foundation. we chose the name to indicate as far as we know know, there have been 30,000 years of steroid -- storytelling. so the border directors are john d. macarthur and the but finally the lawyer for the state of california. this event it is being co-sponsored we'll acknowledge their generosity to bring s to the historic room. we want to welcome richard hudson to greet you and it is professor of marriages and a member of the faculty of american studies and interdisciplinary program. he came to the uc berkeley english department 1964 although he continues teaching and tell this but he it is now president of the west literature association. and that the berkley's annual conference in october and then he said the buck with that. [laughter] >> i basically want to say one word. you happen to be in this tool room of the english department. i'
CSPAN
Nov 3, 2012 8:00pm EDT
right as governor romney himself would say. in america we like to celebrate success, and his success is nothing compared to his partners. three billionaires who operate hedge funds, partnered with romney on a takedown of the treasury in the auto bailout. three guys earned $4.2 billion from the u.s. treasury. you remember that from the debate, right? no one asks, no one is answering that begin today, we got the confirmation from the romney campaign. now, what is this all about? and what does it have to do with the congo? i was reporting for bbc television and the guardian. when i found out that someone had figured out how to dip their hands, their claws into the foreign aid fund, the debt relief given to the republic of congo which is suffering a cholera epidemic. this money was intended to be used, $90 million intended to be used to in the cholera epidemic in the congo and yet it was waylaid by a bird of prey, a vulture, a vulture fund, a guide -- managed by a guy named paul singer. is other middle name is elliott. paul elliott singer who has accompanied by a good name of elliott man
CSPAN
Nov 27, 2012 8:00pm EST
public schools. they will discuss america's education system and its impact on security. it is part of a event hosted by the excellence in foundation for education. right now we are listening to introductory remarks. >> the first african-american woman to hold that post. she's a former national security advisor under president george w. bush. she is also the cofounder of the center for a new generation, which is an innovative afterschool enrichment program, and she is the co-author of numerous books, including two bestsellers. she is an undergraduate degree from the university of denver, a masters from notre dame, and a phd from the university of denver. mr. klein and doctor rice are going to be discussing a report that they have authored, which has been published in march of this year by the council on foreign relations. among many things, this report notes that while the united states invests more in k-12 public education than many other developed countries, students are woefully ill-prepared to compete globally. one tidbit according to the results of the 2000 my program for inter
CSPAN
Nov 11, 2012 2:00pm EST
they put him under tremendous pressure and kept asking him, when is america going to free the slaves? so he began making promises that emancipation was really just around the corner. it was imminent. we were waiting for opinions are ripened. none of this was really true, but it was in our interest ran to say that. oddly enough jefferson really did those are some of this radical feeling over there in france. before he left he's set down a plan and told people about it. he told thomas paine, william short, number of other abolitionists over there. .. >> we want to welcome everybody -- we want to welcome everybody to the 33rd annual american book awards sponsored by the four columbus foundation. we choose the name to indicate that as far as we know there's been 30,000 years of storytelling in north america. so the members of our board of directors are john macarthur fellow, recipient of the presidential medal. the current chancellor of the academy of american poets and finally, the current lawyer for the state of california. this will be cosponsored by the english department
CSPAN
Nov 18, 2012 9:00pm EST
transformed america. we historians love to ask one another how it came to be decided to write about a book giving the topic so would you write about 1965? >> guest: i taught the century american history for a number of years mostly brown university, so i really didn't teach the 60's because it wasn't history but later on that became an important part of my courses and then i've written some books which talked about aspects of the 60's and like a lot of other historians i became uncomfortable in the notion that the sixties could be described as something 1960 to 1976 so they like to talk to the 30's or the 20s or the 90's and so forth you can do that because of the power throughout the decade. mostly it doesn't work and here is the 60's i don't think it does either. because if you look back at what was happening in the early 60's, 60, 61, 63, 64, at least until kennedy assassination in november, 1963 and so much of daily life and popular culture and music and politics and so forth and the way people dress and so forth seem very much like the 50's and when we think of the fifties we think of
CSPAN
Nov 25, 2012 12:00pm EST
, jaime to 65 transformed america. in the book, the bankrupt prizewinner explores the abyss of the passage of the voting rights act come the summer race riots in troop deployment to vietnam. he discusses the divisive year with howard university modern history professor, daryl scott. >> host: hello, jim. it is my pleasure to be here to discuss her new book, the eve of destruction, how 1965 transformed america. as you know, we historians love to ask one another how it became the issue decided to write about a given topic. what brought you to read about 1965? >> well, i cut 20th century 19th century history for a number of years, mostly at brown university. as we move through this thing, i started doing this in the 60s, so i didn't teach the 60s because it was in history. later on an important part of my courses and i've written some books which talked about aspects of the 60s. like a lot of other historians, i became a little bit uncomfortable with the notion that the 60s can be described as something 1960 to 1970. historians like to do this. they like to talk about the 30s or or the 20s or
CSPAN
Nov 10, 2012 9:00am EST
books including america's hidden history: a nation rising, and his 2012 release, "don't know much about the american president." >> host: author kenneth davis, where did the don't know much series of books come from? where did that idea come from?th >> guest: well, the idea for the series came from my own little brain, although it didn't start out as aes series, peter. it really started out with the idea that i loved american history, i wanted to write about it, i wanted to write about it in a way that shared my enthusiasm for a subject i'dwa loved since i was a small title. a small child. the title came of course you and sam song, which i knew from childhood and so it got stuck in my head. and certainly the success of the book, which caught me by surprise more than anyone else perhaps led to the beginning of the series. she outgrew followed and on and on it went from there. so with no pretensions of writing a series of books, i didn't set out to write this book because simply a loved american history. i couldn't understand why we have these surveys that to 17-year-olds don't know their
CSPAN
Nov 27, 2012 11:00pm EST
are in. >> [speaking in native tongue] >> and of course to increase the integration of north america to take advantage of the spaces we have not only in this part of the world but asia of course and just mentioning for instance one the trans-pacific partnerships and the government is very much interested in strengthening this because we believe this is great be a great opportunity. >> [speaking in native tongue] [speaking in native tongue] >> yes and of course in terms of security that is another challenge we face. my government has set out to reduce the violent situation in the country, and for that of course we have set out to launch a strategy for this purpose. we want to help, we have the will to help for the southern states and of course in terms of the border we won the borders to be a safe modern connected a border that is exactly what we set out to accomplish. >> [speaking in native tongue]3 >> [speaking in native tongue] >> for this migration reform demanding what you should do or shouldn't do we want it to contribute and participate towards the accomplishment. so of course
CSPAN
Nov 4, 2012 12:00pm EST
's beginning in 1984 with the paper backing of america, they don't know much series started in 1991. about history was the first, don't know much about geography in 1992, don't know much about the civil war 1996. don't know much about the bible in 1999, don't know much about the universe in 2001, mythology and 2005, don't know much about anything came out in 2007, don't know much about anything else came out in 2008. america's hidden history in 2009, a nation rising and 2010. and then mr. davis returns with "don't know much about the american presidents," which is a brand-new book out this year. now i want to go to your second don't know much, and that is geography. mr. davis, who discovered america? >> guest: well, peter i have to interrupt for just a moment because you last one off the list and it's understandable. i did bring up with me. would like to primary sources. but this is my project about presidents, written when i was in third grade at the william h. holmes school in mount vernon, new york. of course name for washington famous plantation, but that had nothing to do with my inte
CSPAN
Nov 10, 2012 11:00pm EST
an expensive natural gas. we are now in the middle of america and energy revolution. as john maynard keynes said when the facts change, i change my mind. what do you do? the facts have changed. we have been staged on have to ask iran are saudi arabia to send it to us. we have so much natural gas we're talking about exporting at rise in the op-ed describes today that chemical manufacturers 1/2 unattractive back to america up for it it is so cheap rushes it is worried its hold on the eastern european economy will fail because we cannot supply them with natural gas. instead of russia. in this environment subsidizing wind and solar makes no sense. refi china and india and other emerging economies would sign nine so to reduce emissions i don't take a position nine whether man-made emissions cause global warming and i it china and india to make up 37% of the population not doing so. and the first chapter the book i talk about geo engineering solutions win to think we could reduce global temperatures by just came roofs white to reflect the race. what we're doing with a 12 billion-dollar hours it i
CSPAN
Nov 19, 2012 5:00pm EST
their work here if we want america to be the country that leads the world in research and innovation in the 21st century, and as an american i want that to be the united states. this is an issue that can be solved. the american people are way ahead of where their elected representatives are coming and i look at the composition in this room and there is a generation gap. i find that the older people are the less receptive they are to immigration reform the younger they are the more receptive they are to immigration reform, and i have a column in the post that i would encourage all of you to read called the night of the gop began to lose the 2012 election and that was the night that governor rick perry got booed by the audience for defending in-state tuition were for the children of undocumented workers in texas which passed in 2001 with only five state legislators voting against it. do you know how difficult it is to get all but five texas state legislators to agree on anything? it's almost impossible. they won't even agree on what time the sun came up, but they agreed to this legisla
CSPAN
Nov 25, 2012 1:15pm EST
and in iran stuck around for decades, and it's that role that really represented america's influence that stemmed from world war ii, the pro longed war in the gulf. >> host: professor, i think of the british when i think of the involvement in the middle east. when and how did they step back their involvement? >> guest: well, with regard to the gulf, the brits arrived in the 1800s. and it represented their quest to provide order to a part of -- on the flanks to their imperial interests in india. the southern coast of the gulf had been called in the 1800s, the pirate coast, and the constantly feuding tribes fused with one another, which spill out into the sea-born approaches to india, and result in attacks on india, and possibly resulting weakness that might bring another great power. so the british found themselves pulled into the gulf in the 1800s. not to colonize as they did further to the east in india but, rather to maintain order there, and they did, with a relatively small amount of military force. but you're right, the story in the 1800s, and the 1900s, until the early 1970s, w
CSPAN
Nov 29, 2012 9:00am EST
was about having a balanced plan that addressed america's fiscal challenges. acknowledged there were serious fiscal challenges that we do need long-term, deficit reduction. that's important for america's credibility, and it's important for america's economy and economic growth. that plan has to be balanced and that means significant revenues, and it has to go around. typically that means the wealthy and well off have to pay their fair share as well. again, these are not new issues. they are ones that were debated. they came up in every debate. even foreign policy debate. and so we think that the american people are on the side of the president and democrats. that is not to say -- [inaudible] we want to remind everyone that there's already been a trillion dollars, over a trillion dollars in spending cuts. and so that is a significant part of this debate, because it happened last year. but just because washington has a short memory doesn't mean we all should have one. and that there's already been sacrifice on behalf of through those discretionary cuts. we are particularly excited doing a lot
CSPAN
Nov 28, 2012 7:30am EST
-eakin and aol co-founder steve case, at the aspen institute for 30 minutes. >> next we have a panel on america and where it is going, steve clemens -- steve clemons is the empress area of washington ideas. >> hey, folks. everybody is running to the thompson reuters counter. thank you for joining us. great to be with you. i am steve -- steve clemons, editor of large of the atlantic, i want to compliment the museum and tell you how historic this is. this is a jam packed day. the google party is coming up, this is one of three times in the history of the museum that they have allowed an outside group, the other happened to be the president of the united states and madeleine albright when she was secretary of state, this is the third time for a during the day session here, this is a great partnership. i think the -- i have a friend here, allen was the founder of circuit city, just apparently wrote the rise and fall of circuit city and to some degree they are uncomfortable truths, when you think of nations and companies, there are rise and fall stories and the united states is so clean not on the f
CSPAN
Nov 11, 2012 1:45pm EST
historic constitutional freedoms >> no more from america -- book tv college series. this interview was recorded at the united states naval academy. it's about ten minutes. >> on your screen now, professor of history at the u.s. table academy. author of several books, including his most recent, american sheikhs, to families,j) for generations, and the storyk) of americj)a's influence in then middle east. who was dana? >> the founder of what later became the american university of beirut. >> added he go about doing that? >> a lot of american entrepreneur real spirit. >> made the family quite wealthy. >> what was his goal in founding the american university? >> his initial goal differ from a became his life's work. he arrived in the middle east and 1850's determined to convert muslims to christianity and very quickly realized that wasn't going to happen and that's the way to make a connection was not to convert them, but to educate them and to improve their lives and tangible, concrete ways because that is with they responded to positively. once he had that in sight he ran with it and
CSPAN
Nov 12, 2012 12:00am EST
of the world is doing that. america ranks 29th down the speed of its internet behind such leading industrial world as moldavia and ukraine. we pay the highest prices in the world a fire. by one measure would pay 38 times the japanese pay for bit of information. if you buy triple play package, i have one in my home, you pay an average of texas in the u.s. $160. in france you pay $38 u.s. annika worldwide calling to 70 countries come not just the u.s. and canada. worldwide television, not just domestic. 10 times faster downloading and your painless and 25 cents on the dollar. all this other countries under and the fundamental principle in the chronology rather the key to economic growth of industrialization came along and you had to move heavy things like steel. the 20 century came along. it was interstate highway programs and airports that are crucial to economic growth. now it's the information superhighway. the rest of the world is getting the information is deeper highway. as literally told by the chief pr person at ricin that was the phrase i'm not really used anymore. assume the company
CSPAN
Nov 18, 2012 6:45pm EST
is author of "sovereignty and submission: the struggle of global governance and america's constitutional democracy." during the dinner, he delivered a lecture based on his book. it's a little over app -- an hour. [applause] >> thank you, mark. i'm very honored, and it's very flattering to be in such good company in the previous winners of the award. it's also a great honor to receive the award from the intercollegiate studies institute, an organization which for more than 60 years has done wonderful work in sustaining the core principles of american civil life. i also wish to extend condolences to the community for the recent loss of a great lady and great scholar, ann, and i'd like to acknowledge, henry was a stall ward defender of american national sovereignty. i hope that he would have been pleased in presenting this award to me as pleased as i am in receiving it. i'm going to proceed as follows. first, i'll talk about what i call philadelphia sovereignty. second, i'm going to examine the ideas of the global governance project which challenges philadelphia sovereignty, and third, move
CSPAN
Nov 23, 2012 10:30am EST
with one another and i think doing so gives us a history of what his america looks like and it helps us to rethink not only what was going on in the south but what was going on and the national conservative political realm as well rethinking strom thurmond helps us to rethink the modern conservatism. a history that i think too often thurmond is left out of because we remember him as a kind of cartoonish racist figure from the deep south. recounts a decision by five men in putting her on goal rob cox to join the british army in the spring of 1941. six months prior to perlo harbor in america's involvement in world war ii. this is about an hour. [applause] >> thank you. thank you for that kind introduction and for introducing me to bill lewis whose name as far as i can tell the epicenter of support in the entire united states. [applause] thank you tuzee stan booktv for making me feel like oprah winfrey if only for an hour. it's wonderful to be here. is this everything a bookstore should be. i am happy to be in vermont because i have longstanding family ties with the state. can you hear? ta
CSPAN
Nov 24, 2012 9:30am EST
, cloaked in the argument of what is good for america, but there is not allow a policy prescription in there. >> thank you. >> this event took place at the seventeenth annual texas book festival in austin, texas. for more information visit texasbookfestival.org. >> tell us when you think of your programming this weekend. comment on our facebook call or send us an e-mail. nonfiction books every weekend on c-span2. >> next, chrystia freeland talked about a rise of the superrich, the.-- the top 0.one% of the population and the impact they have in the world. this is hosted by politics and prose bookstore in washington d.c. and it is about an hour. [applause] >> thanks a lot. sorry to keep everyone waiting. i will say a few things about what is in the book. as i have been doing some interviews with my book, a favored way of interviewers in the conversation is to save the rich have always been with us after all. actually, that is not true. one of the points, the starting point of my book is to say actually things are different now. we really need to be aware of this new political and economic real
CSPAN
Nov 25, 2012 1:00pm EST
as the insulting term they use is america's mercenaries, because we paid for the -- a lot of the military hardware and transportation and logistics and extra pay the thai troops received. they also tend to focus on those thais who are engaged in black market schemes. the truth behind it all is that thai soldiers were fighting, were dying, for four years thailand was sort of carrying out the war, what they saw at their war, in south vietnam. so, the casualties are something we should keep in mind. >> host: professor ruth, when did thai relations start to gel? thailand has been an ally for a longtime and participated in the iraq war and world war ii. >> guest: yaw can date back to the example of offering abraham lincoln war elephant for his troubles. the american civil war, but definitely in the 20th 20th century, thais were always close u.s. allies, and this is intensified -- disrupted partly during the second world war, but as soon as the cold war gels, thailand pretty much comes in along as a strong u.s. ally, and definitely a strong cold war ally in terms of being an anticommunist component to t
CSPAN
Nov 4, 2012 3:00pm EST
america upside-down. what would happen if we looked at -- there's no reason we can look at it that way. north doesn't have to be a top. we could put south of the top who wanted to. >> host: we will have to leave it there. i apologize. out of time. kenneth davis has been our guest here on "in-depth". thank you very much. >> guest: thank you, peter. >> the presidential election is just around the corner. this weekend book tv has produced several political program from the past couple of weeks. the theme continues now. author edward klein joined book tv at freedom fest in las vegas to talk about his new york times best selling book, the amateur. helix critically at president obama before and after he reached the white house. here is what he had to say. >> well, the book currently on your screen is -- has been several weeks on the new york times best several with list. many weeks as number one. written by anne klein, who is our guest on book tv on c-span2. we do get the title for this book? >> it came from a meeting that bill clinton had in jeff pacoima, new york, north of n
CSPAN
Nov 13, 2012 12:00pm EST
of costs which are going to escalate in the near future and bankrupt america because we can't afford spending on the elderly, on social security and medicare. well, i think if you're a oceanographer or even a mere surfer, none of these -- and this comes from "the washington post" -- none of these actually look like tidal waves. i know it's kind of small, it goes out to 2040. if you just look at the top two, health care spending, public health care spending, medicare and medicaid and social security, the second chart, if you look at social security, as monique said earlier, it goes from a little less than 5% now to about 6% by the middle of the 21st century. that's not exactly a tsunami that threatens to destroy our civilization and calls for immediate, urgent action. what it means is simply over half a century we need to either raise revenues by about 1.5% of gdp, or alternative if you want you could cut social security's benefits by that amount, or you could have some compromise. or you could think about reform within the context of the retirement system as a whole, and arguably as
CSPAN
Nov 17, 2012 9:15am EST
are damaging america's economy". in it, she subjects assumptions and policies which led to such ill-fated federal investments as that of the now bankrupt solyndra solar panel manufacturer as well as the a 123 caller battery manufacturer to a withering analysis which we at the institute have come to expect of the oxford trained economist whose chief of staff for the council of economic advisers. sorry. during the administration of president george w. bush. in her book she helps us understand why the failures of such direct investments in private firms are both significant problems in themselves and cautionary tale for those who would have the government rather than private investors allocate capital. the publication of "regulating to disaster" calfs diana's first year as an institute senior fellow in which she has been prolific and influential. cited by writers, reporters, talk-show hosts across the country. in particular i think of many contributions to our issues 2012 ranging from her analysis demonstrating that even adjusting for the state of the economy the number of americans re
CSPAN
Nov 19, 2012 12:00am EST
have had this decade but it is a close-up on the world of america's society how do we get to 21965 to better understand how much change in place? >> guest: how many books there are on individual years in the '60s bride mentioned the is in my preface. somebody said 1968. that was huge. tet offensive, johnson resigning, and the assassination of martin mr. king, bobby kennedy the wild convention in chicago, woodstock and that sort of thing. it is by no means unique that makes pretty much the same argument that i do i don't have a huge coral with that. in terms of world shattering memorable events then it began to vanish from a view in a hurry. there are real reasons you asked me that but it is why. >> i agree the central year and we could talk about the '60s two talked-about transforming america to say america is not the same after 1965? there is something at stake that 65 bid is meaningful and there is a way one could argue it is not but to have the watershed year is that correct? >> pretty much. not to take it too far but to something starts on january 1st then it is all done to see
CSPAN
Nov 10, 2012 10:00pm EST
places. america is now 29th in the speed of the internet behind such leading industrialites as ukraine. we pay 38 times what the japanese pay for a bit of information. if you buy a triple play package -- i have one in my home -- you pay on average with taxes in the u.s., $160. in france, you pay $38 u.s., and you get worldwide calling to 70 countries, not just the u.s. and canada you get worldwide television, not just domestic, and your internet is 20 times faster uploading and ten times faster downloading, and you're paying less than 25 cents on the dollar. all these other countries understand, fundamental principle in the 19th century, canals and railroads were the key to economic growth as industrialization came along and you had to move heavy things like steel. as the 20th century came along it was highways, interstate highway program, for example, and airports that were crucial to economic growth. now it's the information super highway. and what does the industry say? don't call it that. the rest of the world -- >> did they literally say that. >> guest: i was told by the pr person
CSPAN
Nov 17, 2012 10:00pm EST
of direction how 1965 transformed america. .. >> what brought you to talk about 1965. >> i had taught history for a number of years and as we moved how to -- actually started doing this in the '60s, so i didn't teach the '60s then because it wasn't history, but later on it became an important part of my courses, and then i've written some books which talked about aspects of the '60s, and i became a little bit uncomfortable with the notion that the -- 60s can be described 1960 to 1970. historians like to do that. and sometimes is works. the are 30s you can do that because of the depression throughout the decade. mostly it doesn't work, and in the case of the '60s, it doesn't. if you look back what was happening in the early '6associations '62, '63, '64, at least until kennedy's assassination in 1963. so much of daily life and popular culture and music and politics and so forth, and the way people dressed and so forth, seemed very much like the are 50s, and when we think of the 60s, we think of turmoil, political polarize. >> urban riots. vietnam. rock concerts, woodstock, so forth and so on. a
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